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We research, create and popularise best practices for public interest journalism in the digital age.

We believe in ​​high-quality journalism. The Lab team is aimed at creating content that promoted constructive discussion around complex social topics. In our work, we use interdisciplinarity e. g. cooperation with sociologists and analysts. We test different types of content, analyze audiences' feedback, research public opinion and conduct media monitoring.
WAR

Among our products there are qualitative research, media strategies, documentaries, multimedia content, trainings, etc. Since the February 24 Russian invasion, PIJL has pivoted to frontline reporting for international and Ukrainian media. Our current work also includes documenting Russian crimes in Ukraine within The Reckoning Project: Ukraine Testifies as well as compiling a modern chronicle of Ukraine’s history called “Life in War”.

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The Reckoning Project: Ukraine Testifies

Documenting war crimes and digital storytelling to achieve justice and safeguard rights

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Life in War

Multimedia chronicle of the modern history of Ukraine against the backdrop of the Russian-Ukrainian war

CONNECTING CONTINENTS

The Public Interest Journalism Laboratory invites journalists from Latin America, Africa and Asia to introduce Ukraine to their readers

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Public Interest Journalism Lab (PIJL) was founded in 2020 by Ukrainian journalists Nataliya Gumenyuk and Angelina Kariakina together with activists and communication experts Tata Peklun and Inna Nelles. A pilot research by PIJL was aimed at developing editorial and information strategies during the COVID-19 pandemic.
NEWS
PUBLICATIONS OF LAB JOURNALISTS
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MARTINA JAUREGUY,

BUENOS AIRES HERALD

 ‘Any society can return to its crimes if the narrative changes’: Nataliya Gumenyuk

The Ukrainian conflict reporter and filmmaker on her country’s parallels with dictatorship-era Argentina, shared human experiences of survival, and how to avoid repeating the past

FULL STORY →

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PETER POMERANTSEV,

TIME

Russia’s War Against Evangelicals

After they beat Azat Azatyan so bad blood came out of his ears; after they sent electric shocks up his genitals; after they wacked him with pipes and truncheons, the Russians began to interrogate him about his faith. “When did you become a Baptist? When did you become an American spy?”

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NATALIYA GUMENYUK,

FOREIGN AFFAIRS

Brave New Ukraine

How the World’s Most Besieged Democracy Is Adjusting to Permanent War.

FULL STORY →

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GHANNA MAMONOVA,

VANITY FAIR

Russia Runs a Hidden Prison System for Ukrainian Detainees — In Crimea

Human rights monitors claim that occupation forces engage in torture and prolonged captivity in a sprawling penal network.

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